Photo by Mikhail Pavstyuk on Unsplash

As prisoners, our rights are violated on a daily basis. We do not have access to courts and we face violence everyday. These abuses continue with impunity because almost none of us are professional attorneys. 

Attorneys usually don’t accept prisoners’ cases, no matter how good the cases are, because of the money issue. Additionally, I know from experience that the Department of Corrections doesn’t encourage attorney/prisoner relationships. Prison staff are regularly on the receiving end of prisoner-initiated civil suits for violating prisoners’ rights. 

In the fight for criminal justice reform and prisoners’ rights, nothing will create more change than winning large lawsuits against abusive authority figures. Money is king, even in the justice system. 

Civil rights attorneys are busy and scarce. They are definitely more likely to accept prisoners’ cases when those prisoners receive support from groups of law-abiding citizens. 

The formation of “Civil Rights Support Groups” could be a rewarding experience, which would create positive change inside prisons. 

Form your “Civil Rights Support Group”, and reach out today. 

Disclaimer: The views in this article are those of the author. Prison Journalism Project has verified the writer’s identity and basic facts such as the names of institutions mentioned.

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Immanuele

Immanuele is a writer incarcerated at California State Prison - Los Angeles County in Lancaster, Calif. He is passionate about fairness and open-mindedness. He says he hopes to leave a situation better than he found it. He has asked for his last name to be withheld.