Courtesy of Justice Arts Coaltion
Courtesy of Justice Arts Coalition

The top sketch is from the initial lockdown, and the laundry line is hanging me and my cellie’s clothes. We both worked out, in my case just about every day, so washing and hanging clothes was a necessity. At the time, we were only getting out to shower three times a week at random times. I’d work out first thing in the morning and then wash clothes before my cellie did the same. It would take three to four hours, but routines help keep a person sane during a crazy time.

In the second sketch, what looks like a yellow raincoat are laundry bags filled with packages of potato chips. We didn’t eat a lot of the food they gave us in the beginning, but we would save it. Thus we had a lot of chips. Unfortunately, as time went on, we didn’t get as much food, and we started eating the chips That was when I created a painting called “Bag of Chips,” which was recently on the Justice Arts Coalition site for a charity auction. The items on the table are art supplies and miscellaneous food.

 
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Brian Hindson

Brian Hindson is a contributing artist whose favorite styles of work are impressionism and pop art. He particularly likes pop art for its audacity. His favorite artist is Edward Hopper. Brian is incarcerated in Texas. His work is published on the Justice Arts Coalition.